The two men climbed into the cab and I shuffled across.“I heard that there are crocodiles in the river.“ I asked trying to sort out the rumours I had heard.“Hmmmmm yes there are many.“ answerd the first and almost immeadiatly backed up by the second with the same answer.“Big ones!“ The first man interupted.“Two or three meters long!“ The second blurted out trying to out do the first. This tweedle-dee and tweedle-dum act carried on for a few minutes, but they suddenly noticed my alarm at the thought of boulder hopping and jumping from croc head to croc head accross the river to get to the bottom of the crag. They changed their tune.“But they´re not really dangero…“ he was cut short.“You would have to kick them to make them angry.“ Said the second turning to check the response expression on my face. I was too busy to reply now, as I was staring up at the 180m high walls of the Sebakwe Port gorge. We had picked up the two mento direct ua along the last 30km of dirt tracks as the whole area is a maze of tracks leading of to gold mines and farms. From the banks of the Sebakwe river a lucky person can extract 15g of gold in a day, that is if they´re not munched on a croc first. The large numbers of crocs did not materalise, but climbing up the virgin aretes high above the river made up for it. Our last climbing venue within Zimbabwe was in a national park called Mutapos Hills. The area is littered with great quality high ball boulders interspersed with 40 to 60m crags. Wart Hogs running around the foot of the rock smelling out, and most likely eating, your packed lunch adds a certain comedy value to the whole area. When the enevitable happens and the skin on your fingertips has packed up its bags and left you have to make a choice: Safari, snooze, food, bar or swim ????Take Care Dave To learn more about the Hotrock Global Challenge, click here. _________________________________________________________________