American Skyler Weekes set a new official Dyno World Record at the Cliffhanger event in Sheffield stretching to an incredible height of 2.625m! planetFear organised and ran the Dyno competition with the plan being that Saturday would be a ´have a go´ open to all, with Sunday being the official competition. As it turned out, Saturday´s ´have a go´ event quickly switched into a full-on competition with climbers throwing themselves at the finishing jug. A very large crowd quickly grew and as the hold went higher so did the anticipation. As the competitors literally fell by the wayside, it was only Skyler who was looking close to matching the World Record height of 2.6m. With the previous official World Record holder Matt Heason watching, the pressure was certainly on (Matt was not competing as it was his company that was organising the whole Cliffhanger event). A huge roar was heard across the event field as Skyler matched the World record and with a buzzing crowd, the finishing hold was moved higher. The climber only has three attempts at each height, so with Skyler missing on his first attempt, the chance for a new World Record began to diminish. The second attempt saw a huge effort from Skyler and with both hands matching the hold a massive roar from the crowd signaled the new World Record of 2.625m. The official competition set for Sunday unfortunately had to be cancelled due to the very heavy rain that has been almost a constant during this UK summer.

Skyler Weekes latching the finishing Jug for the New World Record

More details on Dyno World Record: Dyno competitions are becoming more and more popular. Back in 2002 The Edge Climbing Centre in Sheffield arranged the very first officially ratified Guinness World Dyno Competition.Since then a number of unofficial dyno competitions have taken place including the one at the National Outdoor Show in March 2007 which saw Sergii Topishko from Ukraine, aged 18, jump 2m 70cm which equaled the unofficial world record.Full details on how to reach ´official´ Guinness recognition are detailed below but in essence, the main issue is having two independent officials of international standard there to view the winning jump. On Saturday, this criteria was met and so the new height will be entered into the next Guinness book of records. The full criteria, for those interested in organising such a competition, are detailed below: BOARD CRITERIA FOR WORLD RECORD ATTEMPTS 1) Angle of the board is 20 degrees ± 0.25 degrees. This gives ± 5mm of overhang for every 1000mm of vertical height. 2) The reference point for all dimensions is the centreline of the fixing hole of the left hand handhold. 3) The tolerance for any main fixing hole for handholds, footholds or target hold when measured from the reference point is ± 1.5mm. 4) The main fixing holes are 12mm diameter with a M10 ?T? nut in the back of the hole. 5) The holes for the anti-rotation pegs are directly below the main fixing holes in a perpendicular plane and are 12mm diameter but do not require any ?T? nuts. 6) The main fixing holes for the target hold are spaced 25mm apart on a line at 45 degrees leftwards from the reference point. The first hole is 1500mm from the reference point and the holes must extend a minimum of a further 1500mm. The holes for the anti-rotation pegs are 100mm directly below these in a perpendicular plane. 7) The main fixing holes for the handholds are 200mm apart in a horizontal plane. The holes for the anti-rotation pegs are 100mm directly below these in a perpendicular plane. 8) The main fixing holes for the footholds are 200mm apart in a horizontal plane and are directly below the fixing holes for the handholds in a perpendicular plane. The top holes are 500mm down from the reference point with further fixing holes spaced at 200mm giving dimensions of 700mm, 900mm and 1100mm from the reference point. The holes for the anti-rotation pegs are 50mm directly below these in a perpendicular plane. 9) The angle of the board and all dimensions must be independently checked and verified.